ISPOR 18th Annual European Congress
Milan, Italy
November, 2015
PIN77
Infection all
Cost Studies (CS)
Health Econometrics (E)
ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS IN INFECTIOUS DISEASE: WHICH INFECTIONS, WHAT SETTINGS AND WHAT TYPE OF ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS WERE REPORTED IN PAPERS PUBLISHED IN 2014?
Martin A
Crystallise Ltd., London, UK
OBJECTIVES: To determine the focus of economic evaluation papers relevant to infectious diseases that were indexed in the PubMed database and published in 2014. METHODS: An evidence surveillance process was established based on a systematic search of PubMed, using key words relevant to economic modelling in healthcare or disease and limited to studies published in English, in humans, and with abstracts. Articles were included if they analysed the cost-effectiveness of interventions, healthcare service design or methodological issues related to one or more infectious disease. We included all studies with a publication date of 2014 that were indexed in PubMed up to 8 June 2015. RESULTS: The search identified 2,772 articles published in 2014. Of these, 148 were conducted in patients with infectious diseases. Most (32 articles) were in HIV-infected people, 14 articles were in those with hepatitis C, 13 in tuberculosis, 9 in human papilloma virus infection, 7 in pneumonia, and 6 each in influenza and hepatitis B. Twenty-five analyses were set in African countries, mainly on HIV (11 articles) and malaria (4). The 24 analyses in Asia were more diverse, with only 3 each on HIV and tuberculosis. The 30 European analyses were also diverse, with 5 on hepatitis C, 4 each on HIV and pneumonia, and 3 on hospital-acquired infections. Of the 35 North American analyses, 8 related to hospital-acquired infections, 6 to hepatitis C, 4 to hepatitis B, and only 2 each on HIV or tuberculosis. Cost-utility analyses were reported in 58 articles and cost-effectiveness in 43, and only 11 abstracts stated that indirect costs were modelled. CONCLUSIONS: Infectious diseases were the most common disease class to be evaluated for cost-effectiveness in our search for studies published in 2014, with a geographical focus that reflects the relevant epidemiology. Despite potential societal costs from pandemics or chronic infection, evaluations rarely considered indirect costs.